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Polly Eats London For International Women in London: Celebration of the Chinese New Year

Lunchboxes full of lucky food for the Chinese New Year from Polly Eats London! We are happy to announce that we've been invited to prepare and deliver delicious and luxury appetizers to Kensington Chelsea Woman's Club members for the Chinese New Year's online celebration on Friday, February the 12th. Inspired by the Far East and classic Spring Festival food flavours, we created dishes that have their symbolic meaning, and without which the Chinese New year's celebrations never be complete. More about the event and menu...

Chinese Walnut Biscuits (Hup Toh Soh)

Packed with bites of walnuts, reasonably sweet biscuits with a hint of saltiness go great with a morning coffee or an afternoon cuppa. But Hup Toh Soh - Chinese Walnut Biscuits, that symbolise happiness for the whole family are traditionally baked for Chinese New Year celebration. They're given as gifts or served to family and friends. The biscuits are round, slightly flat, have crackly edges and resemble walnuts, hence their name. They are so delicious that you will be whipping up at least a batch at any time of the year.  Find the recipe here...

Hong Kong Style Prawn and Pork Wonton Soup

This is one of the most popular dishes in Chinese cuisine. A clear bullion-like soup served with previously cooked, delicate, filled with pork and prawn dumplings – wontons. The word wonton means "swallowing clouds" and each region of China has different dumpling's sizes and shapes. The delicious wonton soup's secret is a thin dumpling dough that can hold the filling, and an aromatic, nutritious and natural bullion, cooked on good quality meat. The soup sometimes contains bok choi, carrot and noodles but I serve it well seasoned with sesame oil, soy sauce, and sprinkled with spring onions. Find the recipe here.

Chinese Pearl Meatballs with Water Chestnuts and Sticky Rice

Aren't they beautiful? These white balls are made from minced meat and covered with short-grain glutinous rice which becomes translucent after steaming. They look like pearls, hence their name. Pearl Meatballs are a classic Chinese appetizer, originated from Hubei, China. They're a prevalent dish served at banquettes, parties and the Chinese New Year's family dinner. Soft, fragrant meaty balls, with a hint of ginger and tiny bites of water chestnuts, are a real crowd pleaser and a next great appetizer for a New Year Celebration. Find the recipe here…

Vegetable and Mushroom Potstickers

Crisp bottoms and juicy filling, these Vegetable and Mushroom Potstickers are my favourite dumplings. They're stuffed with carrot, Chinese leaves, Shitake mushrooms, bamboo shoots and fresh ginger filling that burst in the flavours of the sweetness combined with spiciness. The potstickers are pan-fried and steamed at the same time; thus, they're moist and crispy. Serve with a potsticker dipping sauce consisting of Chinese black vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil and minced garlic, spiced up with a sriracha dash for an extra kick. Find the recipe here…

Beef and Spring Onion Jiaozi (Chinese Dumplings)

Chinese are famous for their dumplings called jiaozi. Steamed, cooked or fried, they come in various flavours, filled with vegetables, meat, fish and tofu. Jiaozi play a major role in Chinese New Year Celebrations - it is a classic lucky food for New Year that signifies family reunion, represent prosperity and wealth. Chinese New Year is upon us (falls on February, the 12th), which means we’re preparing to celebrate it with plenty appetizers such as Beef and Spring Onion Jiaozi – melting in the mouth extremely fragrant Chinese dumplings, served with spicy dipping sauce. Find the recipe here...

Chinese Dumpling Dough

This is the classic Chinese Dumpling dough, generally for boiled dumplings (shui jia) and potstickers (guo tie) but I also use it - only thinly rolled - for wontons. This recipe calls for the equal amount of flour and water, and a generous pinch of salt which make the tougher dough that needs to rest at least 1 hour; however, the longer the dough is set aside and kept covered with a kitchen towel, the smoother and more springy will be. Freshly made dumpling wrappers needs to be used immediately as they become dry and difficult to shape. Find the recipe here…