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Mini Scotch Eggs

Polish Stuffed Eggs in Shells

Polly Eats London For International Women in London: Celebration of the Chinese New Year

Polly Eats London at Laurence Pidgeon Design: Korean Food

Hot Cross Buns

Whole-Egg Homemade Mayonnaise

Homemade Mayonnaise

Polly Eats London at the Great British Bake-Off: An Extra Slice

Polish Plum Cake

Polly Eats London at Liberté Chérie

Polish Stuffed Eggs in Shells

They are a popular dish served at Easter breakfast in Poland. They also make a delicious appetizer we are used to eating several times a year. Stuffed Eggs in Shells are delicious, comforting and simple to make; however, getting empty shells without breaking them is the most tricky part. The entire unpeeled egg is cut in half lengthwise after being hard-boiled, and the insides scooped, finely chopped and seasoned. The eggshells are stuffed back, topped with bread crumbs and fried in butter. They are best served hot with a slice of fresh bread. Find the recipe here...

Polly Eats London For International Women in London: Celebration of the Chinese New Year

Lunchboxes full of lucky food for the Chinese New Year from Polly Eats London! We are happy to announce that we've been invited to prepare and deliver delicious and luxury appetizers to Kensington Chelsea Woman's Club members for the Chinese New Year's online celebration on Friday, February the 12th. Inspired by the Far East and classic Spring Festival food flavours, we created dishes that have their symbolic meaning, and without which the Chinese New year's celebrations never be complete. More about the event and menu...

Chinese Walnut Biscuits (Hup Toh Soh)

Packed with bites of walnuts, reasonably sweet biscuits with a hint of saltiness go great with a morning coffee or an afternoon cuppa. But Hup Toh Soh - Chinese Walnut Biscuits, that symbolise happiness for the whole family are traditionally baked for Chinese New Year celebration. They're given as gifts or served to family and friends. The biscuits are round, slightly flat, have crackly edges and resemble walnuts, hence their name. They are so delicious that you will be whipping up at least a batch at any time of the year.  Find the recipe here...

Hong Kong Style Prawn and Pork Wonton Soup

This is one of the most popular dishes in Chinese cuisine. A clear bullion-like soup served with previously cooked, delicate, filled with pork and prawn dumplings – wontons. The word wonton means "swallowing clouds" and each region of China has different dumpling's sizes and shapes. The delicious wonton soup's secret is a thin dumpling dough that can hold the filling, and an aromatic, nutritious and natural bullion, cooked on good quality meat. The soup sometimes contains bok choi, carrot and noodles but I serve it well seasoned with sesame oil, soy sauce, and sprinkled with spring onions. Find the recipe here.

Chinese Pearl Meatballs with Water Chestnuts and Sticky Rice

Aren't they beautiful? These white balls are made from minced meat and covered with short-grain glutinous rice which becomes translucent after steaming. They look like pearls, hence their name. Pearl Meatballs are a classic Chinese appetizer, originated from Hubei, China. They're a prevalent dish served at banquettes, parties and the Chinese New Year's family dinner. Soft, fragrant meaty balls, with a hint of ginger and tiny bites of water chestnuts, are a real crowd pleaser and a next great appetizer for a New Year Celebration. Find the recipe here…

Vegetable and Mushroom Potstickers

Crisp bottoms and juicy filling, these Vegetable and Mushroom Potstickers are my favourite dumplings. They're stuffed with carrot, Chinese leaves, Shitake mushrooms, bamboo shoots and fresh ginger filling that burst in the flavours of the sweetness combined with spiciness. The potstickers are pan-fried and steamed at the same time; thus, they're moist and crispy. Serve with a potsticker dipping sauce consisting of Chinese black vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil and minced garlic, spiced up with a sriracha dash for an extra kick. Find the recipe here…

Beef and Spring Onion Jiaozi (Chinese Dumplings)

Chinese are famous for their dumplings called jiaozi. Steamed, cooked or fried, they come in various flavours, filled with vegetables, meat, fish and tofu. Jiaozi play a major role in Chinese New Year Celebrations - it is a classic lucky food for New Year that signifies family reunion, represent prosperity and wealth. Chinese New Year is upon us (falls on February, the 12th), which means we’re preparing to celebrate it with plenty appetizers such as Beef and Spring Onion Jiaozi – melting in the mouth extremely fragrant Chinese dumplings, served with spicy dipping sauce. Find the recipe here...

Chinese Dumpling Dough

This is the classic Chinese Dumpling dough, generally for boiled dumplings (shui jia) and potstickers (guo tie) but I also use it - only thinly rolled - for wontons. This recipe calls for the equal amount of flour and water, and a generous pinch of salt which make the tougher dough that needs to rest at least 1 hour; however, the longer the dough is set aside and kept covered with a kitchen towel, the smoother and more springy will be. Freshly made dumpling wrappers needs to be used immediately as they become dry and difficult to shape. Find the recipe here…

Authentic Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

They are extremely light, puffy and soft, filled with homemade plum jam and dunked in the lemon glaze. Polish traditional doughnuts - pączki (pronounced PAUNCH-key) - are our national treasure.  These sweet creations are made from enriched yeasted dough consisted of flour, eggs, fat, milk, then deep-fried (in oil or lard), stuffed with a sweet filling, glazed or sprinkled with powder sugar and eaten the same day. They're traditionally made for Fat Thursday, the last Thursday before Lent fasting begins. Everyone must have at least one doughnut on Fat Thursday. Find the recipe here…

Cinnamon Ice Cream

Ice cream is not strictly for summer and just because it’s cold and dark outside, doesn’t mean you don’t want to enjoy this frosty treat. Cinnamon Ice Cream is a perfect partner for Apple Pie, a baked apple or any apple desserts commonly eaten in the wintertime. I used the cinnamon sticks to infuse the milk because they give the ice cream full and more complex flavour. The sticks were left in the cold custard overnight and removed just before the process. Cinnamon Ice Cream is delicious and smells insane. Find the recipe here….

Herring Tartare

We can’t imagine the Christmas Eve table without herring. It's usually served pickled in vinegar or oil with onions or with soured cream and finely diced apple. Herring tartare is a great option for having herring this Christmas differently. The tartare consist of Matjes fillet pickled in salted brine and soaked in water, gherkins, shallots, pickled mushrooms, spring onions, all combined with mustard and citrus sauce. The sour capers and red hot peppers give this small dish a kick. The herring tartare tastes great served on dark rye bread. Find the recipe here…

Gougeres

Gougères are cheese puffs made from choux pastry mixed with a generous amount of cheese. Gruyère is the classic choice but I also use Grana Padano, Cheddar, Emmental or Comté of good quality as the better quality the cheese, the better the Gougères. The cheese puffs can be served with soups or salads but they taste great filled with a savoury sauce, vegetable or meat and make wonderful finger food or canapé when you make them bite-sized. Find the recipe here…

Polish Dumplings with Roast Duck, Red Currant and Red Wine Sauce

Duck legs are rich in flavour. They offer much leaner meat than the whole duck which is regarded as one of the fattier meat. Duck legs are great for slow-cooking, confiting, braising and roasting. Their meat usually is served on the bone with sauces and vegetables, sometimes in salads or on toast. I roasted the duck legs with semi-sweet apples, prepared the filling and wrapped it with dumpling dough. They taste amazing with red currant and red wine sauce. Find the recipe here…

Daepa Jeyuk Bokkeum - Korean Spicy stir-fried pork and green onion

This is South Korean classic and a very popular homemade dish. It’s sometimes served wrapped in green lettuce leaves with a spicy thick paste Ssamjang but always accompanied by a beer or strong alcohol. The recipe uses pork belly with crunchy skin and very tender meat that melts in the mouth. Pork belly has a very high fat content which gives the dish a lot of flavour and pairs great with spicy chilli and very sweet garlic cloves. The recipe for Daepa Jeyuk Bokkeum comes from a private collection of Eun-Young CHOI. Find the recipe here...

Buchujeon - Garlic Chives Pancake

Buchujeon is a staple of Korean cuisine and real homemade everyday food. It’s eaten as a snack, an appetizer or a small side dish. The pancake is widely enjoyed by Korean families as is delicious, full of healthy ingredients, easy and quick to make. Kings of the pancake are garlic chives with their subtle garlicky flavour and flat green leaves but they often are accompanied by carrot, green onions, red peppers, chilli peppers, seafood or meat. I had a great pleasure for the first time in my life to eat Buchujeon prepared and served by Eun-Young CHOI at Laurence Pidgeon Design. Find the recipe here….

SoBulgogi - Korean BBQ Beef

The secret of this traditional Korean dish is good quality loin beef thinly sliced. The meat is marinated in sweet sauce and grilled on barbecue or stove in a frying pan. SoBulgogi has been cooked for thousands of years, is very popular in Korea and throughout the world, consumed in restaurants and at homes, during events and parties. The cooking method of SoBulgogi evolved and today varies by region. I met with Eun-Young Choi at Laurence Pidgeon Design to talk about traditional Korean food and learn of her favourite homemade dishes. Eun-Young comes from South Korea and lives in London. Find the recipe here...

Polly Eats London at Laurence Pidgeon Design: Korean Food

There’re many things to love about Korean food. It’s delicious, varied and healthy. It uses plenty of vegetables both fresh and fermented in main meals and side dishes, lean meat and spices. Korean food brings the combination of contrast flavours: sour and sweet, salty and bitter and above of all loves spiciness. I had a great pleasure to take a part in real Korean fest at Laurence Pidgeon Design, taste genuine homemade dishes and learn about the Korean cuisine from Eun-Young CHOI, who lives and cooks in London. More about Korean fest you will find here...