Recent Posts

Mini Scotch Eggs

Polish Stuffed Eggs in Shells

Polly Eats London For International Women in London: Celebration of the Chinese New Year

Polly Eats London at Laurence Pidgeon Design: Korean Food

Hot Cross Buns

Whole-Egg Homemade Mayonnaise

Homemade Mayonnaise

Polly Eats London at the Great British Bake-Off: An Extra Slice

Polish Plum Cake

Polly Eats London at Liberté Chérie

Malt and Honey Dark Rye Bread

This is dark, moist and dense bread with a hint of sweetness - a bit in Lithuanian-style. Barley malt syrup and a little of honey give this beautiful colour of the crumb and a caramelized crust. My recipe uses light rye sourdough starter and a mix of bread and dark rye flour. It requires patience as the sponge needs to be prepared a day before and give it time to rise. But as a reward, the final rise of bread takes only two hours. Malt and Honey Dark Rye Bread is the perfect winter bread which tastes amazing with hard cheese, pickled herring or paté. Find the recipe here…

Cranberry-Walnuts Festive Buns

These buns are totally festive, perfect for a holiday table such as Thanksgiving or as a Christmas morning treat. Soft inside, light, reasonably sweet, full of dried cranberries and chopped walnuts, they taste delicious served warm, with chilled unsalted butter that melts on their tops. The yeasted dough is comprehensive and can be baked as a simple loaf or braided in Challah bread style. Cranberry-Walnut Buns are also great as festive burger buns served with turkey patties, vegetables and cranberry sauce. Find the recipe here…

Politiko Simiti - Greek Bagels

Politiko Simiti are braided circular sesame-crusted bread rings. They're a fuller version of traditional Greek and Turkish bagels - Koulouri and Simiti and originate from the Greek bakers of Constantinople. Politiko Simiti are coated with petimezi – grape sweet molasses that creates caramelisation in the oven, with toasted sesame seeds and then baked. They're crunchy outside, soft and a bit gooey inside. Simiti can be served plain, with jam or cheese such as feta and olives. Traditionally the bagels are baked the same day after a two-stage rise but I kept them in the fridge overnight to get their flavour developed and have the texture lighter. Find the recipe here

Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are a staple of British cuisine. They are made from enriched yeast dough packed with dried fruits, lemon or orange zest, spices and marked with an icing or dough cross on top. The cross is believed to represent the crucifixion of Jesus, the spies signify the spices used to embalm him at his burial. Traditionally spiced and fruited buns are eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday and Easter, however people buy them whenever they feel like a sweet and aromatic bun. In 1592, Queen Elizabeth I banned the sale of hot cross buns on every day except for Good Friday, Christmas and at funerals as they were too special to be eaten daily. Find the recipe for aromatic hot cross buns with a pinch of saffron here…

Easy Homemade Soft Pretzels

I find this recipe easy enough to start an adventure with pretzels. It doesn’t call for a boiling water bath with baking soda which takes more time and requires a bit of experience to get the pretzels “wrinkles free”, slick and shine. The recipe lets the baker focus on mastering the pretzel twirls (which is quite important) as the formula is simple and the dough has a nice consistency to work with. I recommend preparing the pretzel dough a night before a baking day to allow the flavour to develop. The Soft Pretzels are perfect for breakfast, as an appetizer or snack. Great with butter, jam or any favourite dip. Find the recipe here…

Homemade Plain Scones

I was convinced there is only one recipe for this classic afternoon tea treat that everyone follows. But after going through many cookbooks and food blogs, watching lots of films, I realised one thing: the perfect scones don't exist... No answer to the question of how to make the perfect scones! Why is that? Because there are as many recipes as there are cooks, and the taste of homemade scones eaten in childhood lasts in us forever. I found my way in making the best scones that taste heavenly, bearing in mind 3 basic rules: the flour is always sieved, the rising agent used reasonably and the dough is handled as little as possible. Find the recipe here…