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Sourdough starter

Tools
Description
a big glass jar, the best scalded
a piece of cloth
a rubber band or a narrow fabric
a mixing spoon
Tools to prepare and feed sourdough starter Polly Eats London
Pop the jar into an oven heated to 90ºC or boil water in a kettle and pour into the jar. Let the container cool, get it dried if necessary after hot bath. You will need a porous cloth, kitchen towel is fine but I use a muslin cloth. A rubber band or a narrow fabric will keep the cloth on the jar. Wash the mixing spoon in the hot water. And find a warmish place to keep the jar, I set the jar on a shelf in the kitchen not far from the gas hob.
Ingredients
Method
Light rye flour or wholemeal stone ground flour
tap tepid water
I use light rye flour from which some of the bran has been sieved through a fine mesh. I find this flour less intense and easier to control in my starter. You can you the rye flour or whole wheat flour.
1st day,  morning
250 g flour
250 ml water
Pour the flour into the jar, add an equal weight of tepid water. Stir well. Cover the jar with the cloth and secure by the rubber bend; set aside in a warmish place. 
 
The mixture does not have a particular smell; it smells like wet flour.
1st day,  evening
250 g flour
250 ml water
Pour the flour into the jar, add an equal weight of tepid water. Stir well. Cover the jar with the cloth and secure by the rubber bend; set aside in a warmish place. 
2nd day,  morning
1 table spoon flour (20g)
1 table spoon water (20 ml)
Pour the flour into the jar, add an equal weight of tepid water. Stir well. Cover the jar with the cloth and secure by the rubber bend; set aside in a warmish place. 
3rd day,  morning
1 table spoon flour (20g)
1 table spoon water (20 ml)
Sourdough starter, day 3rd Polly Eats London
Pour the flour into the jar, add an equal weight of tepid water. Stir vigorously untill combined nicely into a smooth batter. Cover the jar with the cloth and secure by the rubber bend; set aside in a warmish place. 
 
Before feeding, you should see bubbles forming and the mixture puffed up and down which means wild yeasts have moved in, started to become active and multiply. It still smells wet flour but a fruity smell is already noticeable.
4th day,  morning
1 table spoon flour (20g)
1 table spoon water (20 ml)
Sourdough day 4th Polly Eats London
Pour the flour into the jar, add an equal weight of tepid water. Stir well. Cover the jar with the cloth and secure by the rubber bend; set aside in a warmish place. 
 
The starter is bursting with bubbles and impressively puffed up and then down. The sour smell becomes a bit more intense. 
5th day,  morning
1 table spoon flour (20g)
1 table spoon water (20 ml)
Sourdough starter 5th day Polly Eats London
Pour the flour into the jar, add an equal weight of tepid water. Stir well. Cover the jar with the cloth and secure by the rubber bend; set aside in a warmish place. 
 
6th, 7th day, morning
1 table spoon flour (20g)
1 table spoon water (20 ml)
Pour the flour into the jar, add an equal weight of tepid water. Stir well. Cover the jar with the cloth and secure by the rubber bend; set aside in a warmish place. 
 
The starter works very well. It should be smelling fruity, sour and pretty intense. After 7 days the starter should be ready to use. It depends mainly on room temperature. The fermentation process may last longer in winter and shorter in summer. Continue feeding using the same method for the next days until the starter is ready.

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